DICT HOLDS INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS IN HONOUR OF WORLD OCEANS DAY

June 08, 2010 by dyertrust

WORLD OCEANS DAY 8 June 2010 OCEAN EDUCATION

In honour of World Oceans Day, we held interactive presentations at Laerskool Gansbaai.

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A FIRST FOR AFRICA AND MARINE MAMMALS BENEFIT

June 07, 2010 by dyertrust

Whales, dolphins, seals and dugongs were on the agenda at the1st African Marine Mammal Colloquium (AMMC)held in Gansbaai (18-21 May, 2010). Jointly hosted by the Mammal Research Institute (MRI) of the University of Pretoria and the Dyer Island Conservation Trust (DICT) at the Great White House in Kleinbaai.

Participants hailed from South Africa, Namibia, Mauritius, Kenya, and Zanzibar. Of the fifty delegates were researchers, students, government officials, and tourism operators. Well known names included Prof. Peter Best andProf.Elissa Cameron (MRI), Mr Mike Meyer (Oceans & Coasts previously Marine & Coastal Management), Dr Ken Findlay (University of Cape Town) and Dr.Vic Cockcroft (Director of the Centre for Dolphin Studies-Plettenberg Bay).

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1ST AFRICAN MARINE MAMMAL COLLOQUIUM

June 06, 2010 by dyertrust

Marine mammal research in southern Africa is experiencing an exciting renaissance. There has been a striking increase in the number of research groups, students and projects starting up in the region in the last few years. Collaboration is a key factor in most modern research, allowing small teams with small budgets to generate large findings. In order to facilitate the establishment of collaborations, sharing of ideas and enthusiasm, and avoid the duplication of effort, the Mammal Research Institute (MRI) of the University of Pretoria decided to establish the African Marine Mammal Colloquium (AMMC).

The AMMC is the first meeting of its kind and will be held at the Great White House in Kleinbaai, Western Cape, 18-21 May. Co-hosted by the MRI and the Dyer Island Conservation Trust, the AMMC will provide an opportunity for collaboration, sharing ideas and enthusiasm between University and Government scientists, students, conservationists and tourism operators working in southern Africa.

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STRANDED DOLPHIN TAKEN TO IZIKO MUSEUM IN CAPE TOWN

June 05, 2010 by dyertrust

On April 29, 2010, DICT founderWilfred Chivellwas informed of a stranded dolphin. The dolphin was anIndo-Pacific Humpback dolphin(Sousa chinensis), which is a species commonly found in the waters of Gansbaai, but is in fact a rare animal in the rest of world's oceans. Humpback dolphins are named so after their very large fleshy humps below their dorsal fins.

They are a medium size dolphin with total lengths at 2.0-2.4 meters. They are a shallow water species that are found in depths less than 15 meters commonly just behind the breakers.

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EXPERT SHARK PARASITOLOGIST VISITS DYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST / MARINE DYNAMICS

June 04, 2010 by dyertrust

World renowned shark parasitologist, Professor Susan Dippenaar, from theUniversity of Limpopowas invited to visit Dyer Island Conservation Trust /Marine Dynamicsto advise our researcherHennie Ottoon his study of parasites on the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). Prof. Dippenaar specialises in siphonostomatoids, a tongue-twisting name for a small part of a larger group of animals commonly known as copepods.

Copepods are the most common and abundant animal group found in the marine and freshwater environments. They form such a large part of the zooplankton that it is reckoned that copepods have the largest biomass of any animal group on earth. Many of the 12,000 or so species are planktonic (drift in sea water) and are an important part of marine food chains. They are a major source of food for a variety of animals like seabirds, whales and most fish species including the largest of all known living fishes, the whale shark. Apart from their nutritional value, copepods are also instrumental in the natural carbon cycle. They feed on photosynthetic algae at night, allowing faeces, respiration, moulted exoskeletons and dead bodies to sink to the ocean floor. Deep sea carbon storage forms an integral part of natures way to avert global warming.

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FIRST STUDY OF SHARK WOUND HEALING

June 03, 2010 by dyertrust

First study of shark wound healing

Visit our video footage

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