Giant Petrel Rescue

July 20, 2012 by dyertrust

Giant petrel rescueA team of DICT staff collected another Giant Petrel this week, this time the bird was found swimming around Kleinbaai harbour with an injury to the right wing. Dickie Chivell of Dyer Island Cruises braved the cold water and managed to catch the bird using a net. The bird was taken care of by an experienced team of people overnight and sent through to SANCCOB the next day. Unfortunately the bird sustained a fractured wing and as such had to be euthanized.

Rare sightings like this are always a reminder about the diversity found in the greater Dyer island area.

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Cleaning up with DICT

July 20, 2012 by dyertrust

DICT Beach clean upCleaning up with DICT and the Overstrand Municipality Gansbaai
Dyer Island Conservation Trust recently hosted a young dynamic group of students from the USA who assisted in a beach cleanup at Frankskraal beach. We where fortunate enough to have Benjamin Kondokter from the Overstrand Municipality join us and impart his valuable knowledge.

Mandelas birthday followed the next day and what better way to pay tribute than to clean up our beautiful country. Once again the municipality and DICT joined forces and used their 67 minutes to collect rubbish at Romans Bay. This beach has three dedicated fishing line bins which Benjamin was involved in placing so it was very distressing to find a seagull alive but with his foot entangled in fishing line. Thankfully, Benjamin was able to free the bird.

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Home Renovations at Boulders Beach Penguin Colony

July 17, 2012 by dyertrust

Dyer Island conservation Trust and Marine Dynamic volunteers joined forces with Sanparks Boulders Beach staff and volunteers to do a bit of home maintenance.

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The Southern right whales are back

July 16, 2012 by dyertrust

Breaching humpback whales, feeding groups of Indo-pacific bottlenose dolphins and southern right whales returning for the season These are some of the amazing sightings the theodolite tracking team and the guests on the Whale Whisperer have been experiencing in June.

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Amy's most challenging aspects

July 09, 2012 by dyertrust

great white sharkWhat has been the most challenging aspect of your project?

There is one glaringly obvious challenge with this project and that is not getting your equipment damaged or eaten by a great white shark, owner of the most famous and notorious jaws in nature and popular culture. On the flipside you dont want a shark to injure its mouth if it does try bite your gear. Using a pole-mounted camera/laser rig has its advantages: I dont have to take up a spot in the cage on every trip, and thus I have some flexibility in where I aim it. Slashfin has an amazing set-up where I can be posted onto a specially designed platform, safely harnessed out of the way; I call it the Shark Shelf. Its located on the side of the boat, conveniently away from most of the chum particles. However on an overcast day, it can be quite nerve-wracking. Even with polarized sunglasses and preparedness for the unexpected, one cannot deny that white sharks are cunning predators with incredible camouflage, and very difficult to see when the glare gives the water a mirror-like appearance. Ive had a fair few heart palpitations at the sudden appearance of a great white face near my rig. On these days I sit with the rig out of great white sharkthe water, to be on the safe side, only submerging it when a shark I can see swims by. This is less than ideal though because submerging the rig momentarily creates bubbles which obscure the cameras view of the shark (shoals of mullet can be a similar inconvenience). If Im too slow off the mark I miss capturing footage (ie. data) of most of the body. The curiosity of certain individuals about the new shiny metal object, in addition to the usual bait and decoy, is undeniable, and on a clear, sunny day, can be comedic rather than terrifying; a white shark doing a double-take is quite something!

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