Increasing Occurrence of Stingrays on White Shark Cage Diving Trips

Increasing Occurrence of Stingrays on White Shark Cage Diving Trips

SHARK ATTACK – FISH HOEK 12 JANUARY 2010

January 12, 2010 by dyertrust

Our sympathy is extended to the friends and family of Mr Lloyd Skinner, a 37 year old Zimbabwean man, who died tragically in a shark attack on the 12th January 2010 at Fish Hoek beach.

At this time of the year, the increase of swimmers is matched by the movement of the Great White sharks into the shallows. In the winter months they prey on the Cape fur seal and so are based closer to the seal colonies. Reasons for this change of behaviour in summer are still being researched.

Cape Town’s shark spotters do a fantastic job working year round to notify people of any sharks in the area. They have wonderful vantage points ideally located on the mountains overlooking popular swimming beaches. On the day of the attack in Fish Hoek a warning about poor visibility had been issued by the spotters.

The environment in which we live and on which we depend is undergoing rapid modification because of changes in global climate and because of land-transforming human activities. Our ability to weather these changes depends on our capacity to detect the first signs of them.

From cranes to korhaans to queleas, this new booklet describes how monitoring and research on birds can provide us with the early warning signs that we need. And there are many such signs in South Africa: numbers of African Penguins plummet; Red-billed Queleas, the “feathered locust”, invade new areas; and Southern Black Korhaans disappear from places where they were plentiful 20 years ago.

Many of the findings in the booklet are based on data collected for scientific programmes by trained members of the public. By recording and counting birds at particular places and specific times of the year, these “citizen scientists” are helping scientists to build a jigsaw puzzle of our biodiversity. The booklet contains some of the first comparisons made between SABAP1 and SABAP2.

This 16-page illustrated booklet, downloadable atThe whale season has come to a close and most southern right whales have left our shores. Dyer Island Cruises sometimes has to go skyward to find any remaining whales to ensure they still give their clients the best experience. So on the last day of 2009, our whale spotter, Kira Matiwane, took to the sky in a gyrocopter.

Luckily we found two mother and calf pairs still resting off Pearly Beach thus ensuring a wonderful trip later that day. It is very late in the year for any whales still to be found in the area and we hope they stay a lot longer.

As of the 4th January, we have spotted a total now of 6 mother and calf pairs with one calf being very young and easily identifiable by its lip callosities.

Jan 25th, 2012|Uncategorized|

Increasing Occurrence of Stingrays on White Shark Cage Diving Trips

SHARK ATTACK – FISH HOEK 12 JANUARY 2010

January 12, 2010 by dyertrust

Our sympathy is extended to the friends and family of Mr Lloyd Skinner, a 37 year old Zimbabwean man, who died tragically in a shark attack on the 12th January 2010 at Fish Hoek beach.

At this time of the year, the increase of swimmers is matched by the movement of the Great White sharks into the shallows. In the winter months they prey on the Cape fur seal and so are based closer to the seal colonies. Reasons for this change of behaviour in summer are still being researched.

Cape Town’s shark spotters do a fantastic job working year round to notify people of any sharks in the area. They have wonderful vantage points ideally located on the mountains overlooking popular swimming beaches. On the day of the attack in Fish Hoek a warning about poor visibility had been issued by the spotters.

The environment in which we live and on which we depend is undergoing rapid modification because of changes in global climate and because of land-transforming human activities. Our ability to weather these changes depends on our capacity to detect the first signs of them.

From cranes to korhaans to queleas, this new booklet describes how monitoring and research on birds can provide us with the early warning signs that we need. And there are many such signs in South Africa: numbers of African Penguins plummet; Red-billed Queleas, the “feathered locust”, invade new areas; and Southern Black Korhaans disappear from places where they were plentiful 20 years ago.

Many of the findings in the booklet are based on data collected for scientific programmes by trained members of the public. By recording and counting birds at particular places and specific times of the year, these “citizen scientists” are helping scientists to build a jigsaw puzzle of our biodiversity. The booklet contains some of the first comparisons made between SABAP1 and SABAP2.

This 16-page illustrated booklet, downloadable atThe whale season has come to a close and most southern right whales have left our shores. Dyer Island Cruises sometimes has to go skyward to find any remaining whales to ensure they still give their clients the best experience. So on the last day of 2009, our whale spotter, Kira Matiwane, took to the sky in a gyrocopter.

Luckily we found two mother and calf pairs still resting off Pearly Beach thus ensuring a wonderful trip later that day. It is very late in the year for any whales still to be found in the area and we hope they stay a lot longer.

As of the 4th January, we have spotted a total now of 6 mother and calf pairs with one calf being very young and easily identifiable by its lip callosities.

Jan 25th, 2012|Uncategorized|